Siskiyou Field Institute
Siskiyou Field Institute
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2017 E-Catalog
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2017 Edible Mushrooms of the Siskiyous
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2017 Edible Mushrooms of the Southern Cascades
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2017 Exploring the Hidden World of Truffles
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2017 Forest Mushrooms
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2017 Geologic Tour of the Newer Siskiyous
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2017 Intro to Coastal Flora and Fauna, Pelagic Birds and Marine Mammals
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2017 Rare Lichens of Oregon
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PO Box 207
1241 Illinois River Rd
Selma, OR 97538
Phone: (541) 597-8530
Fax: (541) 597-8533
Contact: Siskiyou Field Institute

Hours: 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Monday-Friday
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2017 Instructors



Tom Atzet, Ph.D has worked as an operations ecologist in southwestern Oregon for over 40 years. He helped develop the national ecological database. He currently works for local conservation groups including the Southern Oregon Land Conservancy and serves on the Western Governors Association’s forest health committee.

 
Larry Basch, Ph.D is an ecologist, natural historian, mountaineer, photographer, author, and teacher. He has travelled and worked for decades all along the Pacific Coast and mountains, and elsewhere from Alaska to Antarctica. He has taught and researched aquatic and marine animals and plants; their interactions in diverse habitats; fisheries; and conservation biology.

Larry Broeker is a retired journey level forest geologist, U.S. Forest Service, Umpqua National Forest, Roseburg. Since retiring he has led many geology field trips sponsored by the Umpqua Community College Continuing Education Program “Geology on Wheels” and more recently with the Umpqua Valley Chapter Native Plant Society of Oregon. He has spent countless hours researching geologic literature pertaining to the genesis of the Klamath Mountains region with special emphasis on areas underlain by mantle-derived rocks.


Keith Bensen
is a fish and wildlife biologist at Redwood National and State Parks, where he is responsible for marine mammal and seabird monitoring as well as threatened and endangered species management.


Ken Burton has lived in northwest California since 2005 and is a wildlife biologist for the Yurok Tribe in Klamath. He is the author of two books, including Common Birds of Northwest California (which will be available for purchase), and is working on a birding guide to Humboldt County. Ken is a frequent trip leader for Godwit Days, Friends of the Arcata Marsh, Friends of the Dunes, and Redwood Region Audubon Society; coordinates the weekly Arcata Marsh bird walks; and is regularly heard talking about ecology and conservation on Humboldt’s NPR station, KHSU.​

Jim Clover formerly worked for the California State Department of Health as a medical entomologist. He became a tick specialist when the first case of Lyme Disease was diagnosed in Marin County and he was working in nearby Santa Rosa. Jim has continued his role as a public educator about ticks in southern Oregon, where he and his wife, Annette Parsons, retired. In addition to tick research, Jim is an avid runner and traveler.​


Romain Cooper resides in the Illinois Valley and works as a biological consultant for bird,botany and fisheries-related projects. He compiles the annual Illinois Valley Christmas Bird Count.​


Dr. Jad D’Allura
, professor emeritus of the former Southern Oregon University Geology Department, taught geology for 33 years. He writes a monthly column about local geology for the Medford Mail Tribune’s Outdoors section. He leads local geology hikes and continues his research in the volcanic rocks east of Ashland.​



August Jackson 
works as Interpretation Coordinator at Mount Pisgah Arboretum in Eugene, OR. An  amateurbotanist and entomologist, he enjoys studying the interactions between plants and insects. He has given presentations on pollination ecology for numerous organizations, and employs  his passion for macro photography in introducing audiences to the world of pollination.​



Dave Haupt has been active in the birding community since 1989, primarily on the West Coast in California and Oregon.  His experience extends from southern California projects with the Bell’s Vireo and Least Tern, to a year with the Forest Service trapping and tracking Pileated Woodpeckers.  He has lived and birded in southern Oregon for the past 17 years.  Dave teaches biology and art in the Klamath Falls area.  


Janel Johnson grew up in Portland.She studied forestry in Alaska for two years before returning to Oregon State University to finish a Bachelor’s degree in botany. Summers working on rare plant and vegetation monitoring projects offered opportunities to travel around the Willamette, Siskiyou, and Mendocino National Forests. After completing an M.S. in Range Science at Montana State, Janel was delighted to find a job with the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest and later the Nevada Natural Heritage Program, her current employer. Janel has served as president of the Nevada Native Plant Society since 2011 and she and her husband Reese are co-editors of the Eriogonum Society newsletter. They currently live in Carson City, Nevada.​



Jim Johnson has been studying Odonata since 1995 and photographing them since 2006. His focus is on the identification and distribution of Pacific Northwest species with occasional forays to other areas of the continent and Latin America. He has served on the Dragonfly Society of the Americas executive council since 2005 as regular member and president (he currently serves as Immediate Past President). Jim has spoken about Odonata to many groups including the Audubon Society of Portland, The Wetlands Conservancy, North Coast Lands Trust, Straub Environmental Center, and has taught workshops at the Oregon State Arthropod Collection and Jackson Bottoms Wetlands Preserve.



 
David Lebo, M.S., is a botanist for the Mt. Hood National Forest. He specializes in lichens, bryophytes and fungi. David served on the interagency tax team for the Survey and Manage Program. He has taught environmental science, botany and ecology at the University of Washington and Oregon Institute of Technology at Marylhurst University.



Photo by Cheryl Beyer

Scot Loring, Ph.D. has worked as a biologist for a variety of Pacific Northwest entities for over two decades, 20 primarily as a consultant for the federal government. He has inventoried many thousands of acres, discovered new species, new genera, and documented numerous other rare and interesting species occurrences within the Klamath-Siskiyou bioregion.  He also studies truffles at the USFS Forestry Sciences Laboratory (Corvallis) and is currently co-authoring the upcoming book Rare Truffles of Oregon. Scot is also co-author of the recently published Rare Lichens of Oregon, available from the Salem BLM office.



James R. LaBonte has studied the beetles of Oregon for over 40 years. He has published over 20 peer-reviewed articles on beetles (including new species descriptions), primarily on Carabidae (ground beetles), a personal research focus. In his job as an Oregon Department of Agriculture entomologist, his emphasis is wood-associated exotic species. His current research concerns taxonomy and natural history of soil-dwelling Carabidae of the Pacific Northwest.


Frank Lospalluto is a field biologist who has worked closely with Klamath Bird Observatory over 12 years doing both spring breeding and fall migration bird surveys throughout the bioregion. American Dippers in Ashland Creek are a special research focus. Frank is an avid birder and photographer who also has a keen interest in regional plants and mammals.

 
Sarah Malaby is a professional botanist with more than 25 years of experience working for the US Forest Service and as a private contractor in Eastern Oregon. She lives in Klamath Falls and is a frequent field trip leader for the Klamath Basin Chapter of the Native Plant Society. She was one of the coauthors and editor of the field guide Common Plants of the Upper Klamath Basin.​
 

 
Celeste A. Searles Mazzacano, Ph.D earned a doctorate in entomology and is the principal scientist at CASM Environmental, LLC. Her experience in research, education, and conservation spans two decades of developing and managing natural resource education and citizen science programs, monitoring invertebrates in streams, wetlands, and springs; developing macroinvertebrate indicators of stream flow duration; and doing surveys, status reviews, and management plans for at-risk invertebrates.



 
Brennan McGinnis served as SFI’s Youth Education Instructor in Fall 2013 and is certified as a Ropes Challenge Course trainer. He graduated from Southern Oregon University’s Master’s program in Environmental Education and has led back packing trips for the Ashland High School Summer Outdoor Program since 2005.



Kristi Mergenthaler has conducted plant surveys in the Klamath Siskiyou Bioregion for 12 years and works as Southern Oregon Land Conservancy’s Stewardship Director. She is an SFI board member and frequent student, Kristi’s accreditations include Wilderness First Responder and certified Northwest Lichenologist.




Russ Namitz set the Oregon Big Year record in 2011, sighting 381 bird species within the state. His record-breaking list included the Hawaiian Petrel and Murphy’s Petrel spotted offshore. Russ began birding in earnest in the summer of 1996. He worked as a seasonal wildlife biologist for 7 years in many of the  western states from Texas to Alaska as well as in Mexico, Costa Rica & Ecuador. He has traveled and birded extensively in the western US, Mexico, Central America and has also birded in South America and Asia. He formerly taught at Marshfield High School in Coos Bay and now resides in Medford and teaches science at a local community college.​




Mike Potts is a local amateur mycologist who has studied fungi and their habitats in southern Oregon since 2007. He is an expert in field identification and has passionately devoted his time to mushroom photography. His photo's can be found in the Audubon Mushroom Field Guide  I-Phone app and on his website (mikepottsphotography.smugmug.com). Mike has been helping with mushroom identification and leading hikes in the Ashland area for the last several years.

 


Chas Rogers, M.S. is a geologist and professor at the Rogue Community College where a yearlong course in geology culminating in “The Geology of Oregon” is offered. With an M.S. in geology from the University of Oregon, Chas has studied volcanic rocks and the Cascade Mountains for over 20 years.​


Dana Ross, MS, entomologist, specializes in butterflies and moths. He has studied Oregon insects for over 30 years and currently works in rare butterfly conservation and documents insects at important sites.



Photo by Kathleen Pyle

John Roth is the Natural Resource Specialist for Oregon Caves National Monument and has worked in caves sciences in National Parks for more than 30 years, 17 of them at OCNM. He has compiled one of the largest databases on cave species north of Mexico.


Steve Sheehy started studying lichens in 2008. For the past five years, he has been surveying lichens as a volunteer at Lava Beds National Monument and has found species not previously described for LABE. He is one of the few Northwest Lichenlogists studying East Cascade and rock lichens. He is a member of both the Northwest Lichenologists and the California Lichen Society. And a certified SFI Naturalist.​



Sean Smith is a botanist for the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Program in Ashland,
Oregon. He is the project lead on several long term vegetation monitoring projects. Sean has been botanizing the Klamath Siskiyou region since 2003. In conjunction with
the California Native Plant Society, he recently published a flora of Lava Beds National
Monument.

Kevin Spencer has been birding for more than 35 years, seen/heard more than 300 species in Klamath County, and has led numerous trips in the area over the years. He says that Rocky Point in June is unbeatable anywhere in the region for diversity of species. He still currently does Breeding Bird Surveys, Point Counts, and other surveys, relying on both sight and sounds of birds for detection.


Daphne Stone, PhD. Lichens have delighted Daphne Stone since childhood. She studied ecology at The Evergreen State College received her doctorate in lichen ecology at the University of Oregon in 1986, studying the succession of epiphytes on oak twigs. She has since worked as a contractor surveying public lands for lichens and bryophytes. She enthusiastically shares her lichens knowledge with others.



Dr. Joshua Strange has spent over 20 years researching and exploring the Klamath River and its fishes. He brings a wealth of scientific knowledge as well as first-hand experience and connections to local Tribes. He has rafted most all of the Klamath watershed and many of wildest rivers in the West. Joshua mentors Karuk tribal youth and operates Sweetwater Sciences, a consulting firm based in Humboldt County, CA.
  


Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey

Dr. Robbin Thorp is Professor Emeritus of Entomology at the University of California, Davis. He taught diverse entomology courses and conducted research on bees and pollination for 30 years. He retired 20 years ago, but continues his research on bees including monitoring bumble bees in the Siskiyous. He also teaches in bee ID workshops, including THE BEE COURSE in Arizona.

 

Photo courtesy of Ferron's Fun Trips

Craig Tuss retired in 2009 after 32 years working for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. He currently serves as Project Manager for the Natural Resource Department of the Rogue Valley Council of Governments, where his main duties include serving as lead for a five-year monitoring effort related to the removal of Gold Ray Dam and lead for the restoration of the Gold Ray Dam impoundment area.



Photo by Jill Pade

Linda Ann Vorobik, PhD. Botanist, editor and illustrator of numerous botanical publications, holds a PhD. from the University of Oregon. She conducts field research and teaches in the Siskiyou Mountains of southwestern Oregon. Linda has over 25 years of illustration and college teaching experience and served as the Jepson Manual principal illustrator.



Lee Webb, M.S. was the Forest Wildlife Biologist for the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest from 1975-2004. Rare plant management was one of his responsibilities.​



William “Bud” Widdowson is a Senior Wildlife Biologist with ICFI International, an environment consulting firm. When based in Arcata, he taught coastal birding classes for SFI. Bud resides outside Redding, California, with his wife, botanist Margaret Widdowson.



Dana York, M.S., has worked for the US Forest Service, Umqua Ranger District, and Death Valley National Park as a botanist. He has conducted botanical surveys throughout California and Oregon on both public and private lands. Dana co-described two eriogonum species with the late Dr. James Reveal, as well as discovering other new plants in the Sierras and Death Valley. He currently works in Eureka, California, for Caltrans as an Environmental Unit Supervisor and teaches botanical workshops in the field for the Jepson Herbarium as well as for SFI.



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