Siskiyou Field Institute
Siskiyou Field Institute
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2019 Field Course Catalog
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2019 Adult Education
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2019 Botanical Watercolors Workshop
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2019 A Post-Fire Kalmiopsis Exploration
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2019 Advanced Plant I.D.: Asteraceae, Graminoids and Eriogonums
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2019 Basin and Range Birding
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2019 Birding Upper Klamath Lake by Canoe
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2019 Botanical Exploration of Mt. Eddy and Scott Mountain Fens
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2019 Butterflies of the High Desert
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2019 Courses by Date
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2019 Dragonflies Workshop
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2019 Edible and Medicinal Plants of the Illinois Valley Valley
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2019 Edible Mushrooms of the Siskiyous
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2019 Edible Mushrooms of the Southern Cascades
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2019 Estuarine Ecology: South Slough by Canoe
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2019 Exploring the World of Fungi
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2019 Geology of the Central Klamath Mountains
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2019 Great Basin Flora: Botanizing on Steens and Hart Mountains
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2019 Illinois River Natural History from a Raft
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2019 Instructors
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2019 Intermediate Lichens: The Genus Usnea
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2019 Introduction to Butterflies and Moths of the Siskiyous
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2019 Klamath River Natural History from a Raft
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2019 Landscaping with Oregon Native Plants
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2019 Lassen Geology
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2019 Lava Beds Birds, Flora and Lichens
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2019 Marine Biology Field Adventure including Pelagic Birding
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2019 Medicinal Plants of Northern California
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2019 Meet the Beetles: Carabidae and Coleoptera
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2019 Native Bees Workshop
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2019 Native Ferns
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2019 Naturalist Certificate Program
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2019 Plant I.D. Basics + Sunday Foray to the Glide Wildflower Show
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2019 Seaweed Ecology
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2019 Spring Mushroom Foray at Pacifica: Morels and More
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2019 Spring Mushroom Foray
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2019 The Art of Lichen Dyeing
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2019 The Healing Forest
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2019 Wildflowers of Crater Lake: Botany and Photography
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2019 Youth Education
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2019 Stay at SFI
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2019 Registration & Reservations
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2019 Job Opportunities
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Our 2019 Season Sponsors
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2019 Hire a Guide
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Field Research at SFI
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Directions to SFI
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2019 Free Learning Programs
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Calendar
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News
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Staff and Board of Directors
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PO Box 207
1241 Illinois River Rd
Selma, OR 97538
Phone: (541) 597-8530
Fax: (541) 597-8533
Contact: Siskiyou Field Institute

Hours: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday (spring to fall hours)
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2019 Instructors


Larry Basch
Larry Basch, Ph.D is an ecologist, natural historian, mountaineer, photographer, author, and teacher. He has travelled and worked for decades all along the Pacific Coast and mountains, and elsewhere from Alaska to Antarctica. He has taught and researched aquatic and marine animals and plants; their interactions in diverse habitats; fisheries; and conservation biology.

C Beyer
Cheryl Beyer has a B.S. degree in Botany and an M.S. degree in Natural Resource Conservation from the University of Montana, Missoula. She has worked as a Forest Service botanist in Montana,  the Modoc and Tahoe National Forests, Lake Tahoe Basin in California and the Suislaw National Forest and BLM in Oregon and Nevada. She taught botany at Umpqua Community College while working for the Roseburg BLM. Cheryl’s expertise included vascular plants,  bryophytes, lichens, and fungi, and she has published in the Bulletin of the California Lichen Society,” Solorina spongiosa: A new species record for Nevada,” and “Lake Tahoe’s Lichen Trimline,” 22(2) 2015, and on-line with the USDA Forest Service, Selected Wildflowers of the Modoc National Forest, and on “Celebrating Wildflowers.”

Ken Carloni


Ken Carloni, Ph.D. received his M.S. in Evolutionary Ecology from the University of Connecticut focusing on pollination ecology and his Ph.D. in Forest Ecology at Oregon State University where he investigated the use of landscape fire by local indigenous people as a natural resource management tool, and on the change in forest patterns and processes resulting from Euro-American recolonization. He has volunteered for many years at the Glide Wildflower Show and has been involved with local Douglas County resource conservation work for decades. He recently retired from chairing the Science Department at Umpqua Community College where he taught field botany, forest biology, historical ecology, microbiology and genetics for 30 years.

Max Creasy
Max Creasy is a retired forest ecologist with the Klamath National Forest and a member of the mid Klamath Watershed Council who has been active in Klamath restoration planning in the Orleans/Somes Bar area. He lives with his wife Nena in Somes Bar.

Nancy Winslow Foster
Nancy Winslow Foster, B.S., resides in the East Bay area of northern California,where she is active in environmental education. As a child, she spent hours in rural Maine exploring lakes, woods and ocean beaches. In high school, she spent time in the Santa Cruz mountains as a camp counselor helping kids enjoy banana slugs, night skies and songs around the campfire. Her passion for environmental concerns guided her to working with UNESCO, earning a B.S. in Environmental Planning & Management at UC Davis, working with the Youth Conservation Corps as an environmental educator, guiding trips for Wilderness Ventures and the Lane County Juvenile Department. Most recently she became a forest therapy guide through the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy and training with the organizations’ founder, Amos Clifford. Nancy believes that forest bathing is a gentle and profound step toward renewing both our physical and emotional well -being while deepening our connection to our periled planet.

Dorota Haber Lehigh
Dorota Haber-Lehigh, M.A., is an artist, educator and a naturalist with a passion for native plants. Dorota loves field sketching, mushroom hunting, botanical drawing and learning about ethnobotany. She holds degrees in Art and International Studies (focus on indigenous cultures) and an Master’s degree in Teaching. She is currently working on a diploma in Botanical Illustration from Society of Botanical Artists in London. She is a member of Oregon Botanical Artists and American Society of Botanical Artists. She enjoys teaching nature and botanical drawing, natural science illustration and ethnobotany. Dorota has self-published two ethnobotanical coloring books: ABC of Native Plants and Native Berries of the Pacific Northwest.

Dave Haupt
Dave Haupt, B.S. has been active in the birding community since 1989, primarily on the West Coast in California and Oregon. His experience extends from southern California projects with the Bell’s Vireo and Least Tern, to a year with the Forest Service trapping and tracking Pileated Woodpeckers. He has lived and birded in southern Oregon for the past 15 years. Dave teaches biology and art in the Klamath Falls area.

Bill Hirt
Bill Hirt, Ph.D., grew up in southern California and earned his degrees in geology from UCLA and UC Santa Barbara. He served as the geology instructor at College of the Siskiyous in Weed, California from 1991 through 2018, teaching both general geology courses as well as several short courses on regional geology in the Klamath Mountains and southern Cascades.



August Jackson new
August Jackson works as Interpretation Coordinator at Mount Pisgah Arboretum in Eugene, OR. August has been studying and photographing the region’s pollinating insect fauna for six years. He is excited about sharing his passion for insects and teaches classes on pollination ecology and bee identification throughout the state. He is currently also working with the Oregon Bee Project to help train volunteers in bee identification.

Janel Johnson
​Janel Johnson, M.S. grew up in Portland.She studied forestry in Alaska for two years before returning to Oregon State University to finish a Bachelor’s degree in botany. Summers working on rare plant and vegetation monitoring projects offered opportunities to travel around the Willamette, Siskiyou, and Mendocino National Forests. After completing an M.S. in Range Science at Montana State, Janel was delighted to find a job with theHumboldt-Toiyabe National Forest and later the Nevada Natural Heritage Program, her current employer. Janel has served as president of the Nevada Native Plant Society since 2011 and she and her husband Reese are co-editors of the Eriogonum Society newsletter. They currently live in Carson City, Nevada.0 Siskiyou Field Institute • 541.597.8530 •

Jim Johnson
Jim Johnson
 has been studying Odonata since 1995 and photographing them since 2006. His focus is on the identification and distribution of Pacific Northwest species with occasional forays to other areas of the continent and Latin America. He has served on the Dragonfly Society of the Americas executive council since 2005 as regular member and president (he currently serves as Immediate Past President). Jim has spoken about Odonata to many groups including the Audubon Society of Portland, The Wetlands Conservancy, North Coast Lands Trust, Straub Environmental Center, and has taught workshops at the Oregon State Arthropod Collection and Jackson Bottoms Wetlands Preserve. Jim currently works at the Mount Saint Helen's Institute as a Research Technician.

Lauren Kemple
Lauren Kemple studied for two years at the Vitalist School of Herbology in Ashland, Oregon. She is a mother, plant lover, and has been an outdoor educator since 2001.


Erin McKinsey
Erin McKinsey, M.S. is a dispensary herbalist at a natural healing center and has worked as a scientist at a natural product research laboratory. She has a background in environmental education and a passion for plants.

Jim LaBonte
James R. LaBonte, M.S.,  has studied the beetles of Oregon for over 40 years. He has published over 20 peer-reviewed articles on beetles (including new species descriptions), primarily on Carabidae (ground beetles), a personal research focus. In his job as an Oregon Department of Agriculture entomologist, his emphasis is wood­associated exotic species. His current research concerns taxonomy and natural history of soil dwelling Carabidae of the Pacific Northwest.




Photo by Cheryl Beyer
Scot Loring, M.S., has worked as a biologist for a variety of Pacific Northwest entities for 21 years, 17 primarily as a consultant for the federal government. He has inventoried many thousands of acres, discovered new species, new genera, and documented numerous other rare and interesting species occurrences within the Klamath-Siskiyou bioregion. He also studies truffles at the USFS Forestry Sciences Laboratory (Corvallis) and is currently involved in co-writing the upcoming book Rare Truffles of Oregon.

Frank Lospalluto
Frank Lospalluto is a field biologist who has worked closely with Klamath Bird Observatory for over a decade doing both spring breeding and fall migration bird surveys throughout the bioregion. American Dippers inAshland Creek are a special research focus. Frank is an avid birder and photographer who also has a keen  interest in regional plants and mammals.


Mike Potts
Mike Potts is a local amateur mycologist who has studied fungi and their habitats in southern Oregon since 2007. He is an expert in field identification and has passionately devoted his time to mushroom photography. His photos can be found in the Audubon Mushroom Field Guide I-Phone app and on his website. Mike has been helping with mushroom identification and leading hikes in the Ashland area for the past several years.

Chas Rogers
Chas Rogers, M.S., is a geologist and professor at the Rogue Community College where a yearlong course in geology culminating in “The Geology of Oregon” is offered. With an M.S. in geology from the University of Oregon, Chas has studied volcanic rocks and the Cascade Mountains for over 20 years.

J Rohde
Justin Rohde, M.S. has ten years of experience conducting habitat assessments of fish habitat in southwest Oregon for the Siskiyou Research Group. His surveys have led him to explore some of the wildest and most remote streams in Oregon, including tributaries of the Wild & Scenic Illinois, Chetco, and North Fork Smith rivers. In 2014, he published his first guide book on the Illinois Valley entitled Hiking Oregon & California’s Wild Rivers Country by Backcountry Press. Justin recently completed his master's degree in archaeology and is currently employed as an Archaeological Technician for Northwind (Alaska Native Corporation).

Dana Ross
Dana Ross, M.S., entomologist, specializes in butterflies and moths. He has studied Oregon insects for over 30 years and currently works in rare butterfly conservation and documents insects at important sites.



Sean Smith
Sean Smith, M.S. is a botanist for the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Program in Ashland, Oregon. He is the project lead on several long term vegetation monitoring projects. Sean has been botanizing the  Klamath Siskiyou region since 2003. In conjunction with the California Native Plant Society, he recently published a Flora of Lava Beds National Monument.

Kevin Spencer
Kevin Spencer has been birding for more than 35 years, seen/heard more than 300 species in Klamath County, and has led numerous trips in the area over the years. He says that Rocky Point in June is unbeatable anywhere in the region for diversity of species. He still currently does Breeding Bird Surveys, Point Counts, and other surveys, relying on both sight and sounds of birds for detection.

Daphne Stone
Lichens have delighted Daphne Stone, Ph.D., since childhood. She studied ecology at The Evergreen State College and received her doctorate in lichen ecology at the University of Oregon in 1986, studying the succession of epiphytes on oak twigs. She has since worked as a contractor surveying public lands for lichens and bryophytes. She enthusiastically shares her lichens knowledge with others.

Craig Tuss
Craig Tuss
retired in 2009 after 32 years working for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. He currently serves as Project Manager for the Natural Resource Department of the Rogue Valley Council of Governments, where his main duties include serving as lead for a five-year monitoring effort related to the removal of Gold Ray Dam and lead for the restoration of the Gold Ray Dam impoundment area. 

Linda Vorobik
Linda Ann Vorobik, Ph.D.,
is a botanist, editor and illustrator of numerous botanical publications, holds a PhD from the University of Oregon. She conducts field research and teaches in the Siskiyou Mountains of southwestern Oregon. Linda has over 25 years of illustration and college teaching experience and served as the Jepson Manual principal illustrator.

Lee Webb
Lee Webb, M.S.
was the Forest Wildlife Biologist for the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest from 1975-2004. Rare plant management was one of his responsibilities. He serves on the SFI and Siskiyou Audubon boards.

Brian Kie Wiessbuch
Brian Kie Weissbuch, L.Ac. is a botanist, acupuncturist and herbalist with 43 years experience as an instructor and herbal practitioner. He is co-founder of KW Botanicals Inc., a manufacturer of premium herbal extracts for professional use. He consults with primary health care practitioners (MDs, NDs, acupuncturists and veterinarians) to provide herbal formulas for their patients.

Bud Widdowson
William “Bud” Widdowson, B.S.,
is a Senior Wildlife Biologist with ICFI International, an environmental consulting firm. When based in Arcata, he taught birding classes for SFI. Bud resides outside Redding, California, with his wife, botanist Margaret Widdowson.

Kelpie Wilson
Kelpie Wilson, B.S. is an engineer and analyst with 35 years of experience in renewable energy, sustainable forestry and resource conservation. She worked for the Siskiyou Regional Education Project for 12 years, serving as its executive director during the 1990s. As director of the Siskiyou Project, she helped found the Siskiyou Field Institute and secure its initial funding. Since 2008 she has focused on biochar. From 2008-2012 she was employed by the International Biochar Initiative and was responsible for managing a multi-stakeholder process to draft the first international standards and testing guidelines for biochar materials. She has consulted with private industry and government agencies through her company Wilson Biochar Associates. She is a founder and board member of the US Biochar Initiative. She presents many classes and workshops on biochar production and use every year.

Rachel Winters
Rachel Winters, a self-confessed plant addict, has been teaching plant identification, ecology, and horticulture at Rogue Community College for a number of years. She owns Siskiyou Gardens, a small nursery specializing in bonsai and unusual trees. Previously she operated a local landscape maintenance and design business. Rachel developed an interpretive nature trail at Fish Hatchery Park near Grants Pass as well as being on the team that created the arboretum walk and brochure at RCC’s Redwood Campus. Rachel is a long-time hand weaver and creates her own fiber dyes from a variety of local lichens.


Dana York
Dana York, M.S.,
has worked for the US Forest Service, Umqua Ranger District, and Death Valley National Park as a botanist. He has conducted botanical surveys throughout California and Oregon on both public and private lands. Dana co-described two eriogonum species with the late Dr. James Reveal, as well as discovering other new plants in the Sierras and Death Valley. He currently works in Eureka, California, for Caltrans as an Environmental Unit Supervisor and teaches botanical workshops in the field for the Jepson Herbarium.



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